Immersive Art Body

Immersive Art Body

So one of the perks of being a graduate student at Drury is that you get your own studio space.  Well, not only did I get  a studio space, but a really big studio space!  So I decided I should fill it.  I wasn’t sure what my intention was to be in doing this other than I need to investigate a material which I have only recently become acquainted as well as working with a fully immersed and interactive environment.  I began throwing paint only a few years ago and more recently picked up a brush and even more recent have begun using canvas.  I appreciate all materials, but it often becomes their malleability and texture that becomes more interesting to me. To set the experiment in action I have hung store bought dropcloths along the walls, across the floor and from several locations within the space.  I imagine these elements changing orientation and location as this moves along.  They are all hung in rather haphazard manners.  I like to break the illusion of linearity whenever possible in my work.  I have taken the opportunity to run the cloth up the wall from the floor, creating subtle curves and transitions.  I believe this will set up parameters to encourage me to make thoughtful decisions about how I interact with these materials, my process, art and reality. After spending some time in this space, curious questions have already begun to arise.  First I’d like to address some awareness that I have of the space.  Obviously this gives me fuller range of physical motion.  I get more aggressive as making large subtle gestures.  The position transitions from wall to floor create nice rolling movements as more moisture is introduced.  As well as the bunched areas of cloth which pool and catch falling pigment in interesting manners.  Although the space is large, I have immediate noticed limitations.  I believe these are mainly physical, like overextending a movement and launching painting across the room or across my face.  I try to encourage limitations as something to be appreciated and worked with, rather than ignored or set as barriers.  There is always room in process for limitations.  [pull closer] My art process has always understood that I am creating a reality.  Micro moments, learning transitions, enveloped space, seeming realities, catalystic dialectic brought forth through love, honesty and appreciation.  As this playful space reveals itself, I hear echoes of utopian dissonance and non from lectures, telling me this is the path.  This event will be a documented process and all moments will be opportunities to make an artful stance. Another observation that begs many questions is that of functional or workspace as compared or valued to art space and what is the difference if any.  I find it interesting that this observation was made not only by myself, but others as well.  And this all came together on a day when I’m reading about a new project a friend is working with referred to as “occupational realism”.  You may take that term for what it is, I am just an observer.  Firstly, in this space, I am using dropcloths I got from a hardware store.  They are hung in a manner that seems to almost create a theatrical space.  The use of them on the floor as well as the wall seems to question their identity from the start.  As I move through the process I feel compelled to “wipe” my hands of paint on the cloths; or should I say canvas?  This process feels cleansing, yet artful and beautiful, thoughtful and satisfying.  This makes me question. The identity of this space seems unsure to viewers.  Is it an interactive space?  Can you touch or even walk in?  Is this a work space or an art space?  Or is it an aerobic manifestation of my head space?  All interesting questions that I am enjoying exploring with myself and others.

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